Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

Barriers from calling ambulance after recognizing stroke differed in adults younger or older than 75 years old in China

Shengde Li, Li-Ying Cui, Craig Anderson, Chunpeng Gao, Chengdong Yu, Guangliang Shan, Longde Wang, Bin Peng
DOI: 10.21203/rs.2.10088/v2

Abstract

Abstract Background: As health behavior varies with increasing age, we aimed to examine the potential barriers in calling emergency medical services (EMS) after recognizing a stroke among 40–74- and 75–99-year-old adults. Methods: Data were obtained from a cross-sectional community-based study (FAST-RIGHT) that was conducted from January 2017 to May 2017 and involved adults (age ≥40 years) across 69 administrative areas in China. A subgroup of residents (153675) who recognized stroke symptoms was analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed in the 40–74 and 75–99 age groups, separately, to determine the factors associated with wait-and-see behaviors at the onset of a stroke. Results: In the 40–74 and 75–99 age groups, the rates of participants who chose “Self-observation at home” were 3.0% (3912) and 3.5% (738), respectively; the rates of “Wait for family, then go to hospital” were 31.7% (42071) and 33.1% (6957), respectively. Rural residence, living with one's spouse, low income (< 731 US $ per annum), having a single avenue to learn about stroke, and having friends with stroke were factors associated with waiting for one's family in both groups. However, unlike in the 40–74 age group, sex, number of children, family history, and stroke history did not influence the behaviors at stroke onset in the 75–99 age group. Conclusions: Different barriers from recognizing stroke and calling an ambulance exist in the 40-74 and 75-99 age groups in this specific population. Different strategies that mainly focus on changing the “Wait for family” behavior and emphasize on immediately calling EMS are recommended for both age groups.

Keywords
stroke, aging, healthy behaviors, emergency medical services, awareness, family, health education

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Version 2

Posted 31 Jul, 2019

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    On 18 Aug, 2019

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    Received 14 Aug, 2019

  • Reviewer #2 agreed

    On 04 Aug, 2019

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    Invitations sent on 02 Aug, 2019

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    On 02 Aug, 2019

  • Review #1 received

    Received 02 Aug, 2019

  • Editor assigned

    On 19 Jul, 2019

  • Submission checks complete

    On 18 Jul, 2019

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    On 18 Jul, 2019

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Neurology

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Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

Barriers from calling ambulance after recognizing stroke differed in adults younger or older than 75 years old in China

Shengde Li, Li-Ying Cui, Craig Anderson, Chunpeng Gao, Chengdong Yu, Guangliang Shan, Longde Wang, Bin Peng

STATUS: In Revision

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 0
HTML Views: 11

Integrity Check:

  • Article

  • Peer Review Timeline

  • Related Articles

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Abstract

Abstract Background: As health behavior varies with increasing age, we aimed to examine the potential barriers in calling emergency medical services (EMS) after recognizing a stroke among 40–74- and 75–99-year-old adults. Methods: Data were obtained from a cross-sectional community-based study (FAST-RIGHT) that was conducted from January 2017 to May 2017 and involved adults (age ≥40 years) across 69 administrative areas in China. A subgroup of residents (153675) who recognized stroke symptoms was analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed in the 40–74 and 75–99 age groups, separately, to determine the factors associated with wait-and-see behaviors at the onset of a stroke. Results: In the 40–74 and 75–99 age groups, the rates of participants who chose “Self-observation at home” were 3.0% (3912) and 3.5% (738), respectively; the rates of “Wait for family, then go to hospital” were 31.7% (42071) and 33.1% (6957), respectively. Rural residence, living with one's spouse, low income (< 731 US $ per annum), having a single avenue to learn about stroke, and having friends with stroke were factors associated with waiting for one's family in both groups. However, unlike in the 40–74 age group, sex, number of children, family history, and stroke history did not influence the behaviors at stroke onset in the 75–99 age group. Conclusions: Different barriers from recognizing stroke and calling an ambulance exist in the 40-74 and 75-99 age groups in this specific population. Different strategies that mainly focus on changing the “Wait for family” behavior and emphasize on immediately calling EMS are recommended for both age groups.

Figures

Introduction

Methods

Results

Discussion

List of abbreviations:

Declarations

References

Tables

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