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Psychosocial, Behavioral and Clinical correlates of children with overweight and obesity

Vidhu V Thaker, Stavroula K. Osganian, Sarah D. de Ferranti, Kendrin R. Sonneville, Jennifer K. Cheng, Henry A. Feldman, Tracy K. Richmond
DOI: 10.21203/rs.2.11692/v1

Abstract

Background

Psychological and behavioral correlates are considered important in the development and persistence of obesity in both adults and youth. This study aimed to identify such features in youth with severe obesity (BMI ≥ 120% of 95th percentile of sex-specific BMI-for-age) compared to those with overweight or non-severe obesity.

Methods

Youth with BMI ≥ 85th percentile were invited to participate in a prospective research registry where data was collected on attributes such as family characteristics, eating behaviors, dietary intake, physical activity, perception of health and mental well-being, and cardiometabolic parameters.

Results

In a racially/ethnically diverse cohort of 105 youth (65% female, median age 16.1 years, range 4.62-25.5), 51% had severe obesity. The body fat percent increased with the higher levels of obesity. There were no differences in the self-reported frequency of intake of sugar sweetened beverages or fresh produce across the weight categories. However, the participants with severe obesity reported higher levels of emotional eating and eating when bored (p=0.022), levels of stress (p =0.013), engaged in fewer sports or organized activities (p=0.044), and had suboptimal perception of health (p=0.053). Asthma, depression and obstructive sleep apnea were more frequently reported in youth with severe obesity. The presence of abnormal HDL, HOMA-IR, CRP and multiple cardiometabolic risk factors were more common among youth with severe obesity.

Conclusions

Youth with severe obesity have identifiable differences in psychosocial and behavioral attributes that can be used to develop targeted intervention strategies to improve their health.

Keywords
childhood obesity, psychosocial, behavioral

Introduction

Study Design and Participants

Results

Discussion

Declarations

References

Tables

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Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.

Psychosocial, Behavioral and Clinical correlates of children with overweight and obesity

Vidhu V Thaker, Stavroula K. Osganian, Sarah D. de Ferranti, Kendrin R. Sonneville, Jennifer K. Cheng, Henry A. Feldman, Tracy K. Richmond

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Abstract

Background

Psychological and behavioral correlates are considered important in the development and persistence of obesity in both adults and youth. This study aimed to identify such features in youth with severe obesity (BMI ≥ 120% of 95th percentile of sex-specific BMI-for-age) compared to those with overweight or non-severe obesity.

Methods

Youth with BMI ≥ 85th percentile were invited to participate in a prospective research registry where data was collected on attributes such as family characteristics, eating behaviors, dietary intake, physical activity, perception of health and mental well-being, and cardiometabolic parameters.

Results

In a racially/ethnically diverse cohort of 105 youth (65% female, median age 16.1 years, range 4.62-25.5), 51% had severe obesity. The body fat percent increased with the higher levels of obesity. There were no differences in the self-reported frequency of intake of sugar sweetened beverages or fresh produce across the weight categories. However, the participants with severe obesity reported higher levels of emotional eating and eating when bored (p=0.022), levels of stress (p =0.013), engaged in fewer sports or organized activities (p=0.044), and had suboptimal perception of health (p=0.053). Asthma, depression and obstructive sleep apnea were more frequently reported in youth with severe obesity. The presence of abnormal HDL, HOMA-IR, CRP and multiple cardiometabolic risk factors were more common among youth with severe obesity.

Conclusions

Youth with severe obesity have identifiable differences in psychosocial and behavioral attributes that can be used to develop targeted intervention strategies to improve their health.

Introduction

Study Design and Participants

Results

Discussion

Declarations

References

Tables

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