Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

A RE-AIM Evaluation of a multi-modal real-world intervention for dementia risk reduction

Christine Stirling, Helga Merl, Indra Arunachalam, Ashley Turner, Carolyn King
DOI: 10.21203/rs.2.10970/v1

Abstract

Background

This implementation study evaluated a novel community-based Memory Wellness Program targeting dementia risk reduction through increasing health knowledge and health promoting behaviours in older adults. The nurse-led eight-week program involved the following behaviour change strategies: goal-setting, education, group activity, and introduction to the use of iPads and Misfit activity trackers. The multi-model program was delivered in a realworld setting using pop-up clinics run by a Registered Nurse, across 18 different sites.

Methods

Using a quasi-experimental mixed methods design, and a RE-AIM framework, the study evaluated the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation and maintenance of the MWP. A total of 179 older adults aged 65 years and over participated in the evaluation across eighteen locations in three states and a territory of Australia. Paired t-tests were carried out on all pretest-posttest clinical data. In-depth interviews were conducted with seventeen participants and staff.

Results

Engagement in the program was associated with improved cognition, lowered BP and stress and increased engagement with technology. There was a trend towards reduced feelings of loneliness. Participants’ main motivations for undertaking the program were to improve memory, meet new people and improve technology use and computer literacy, with most participants reporting that these goals had been met through the program. The program was effective across multiple sites demonstrating it can successfully be implemented in different contexts and that the range of behaviour change techniques suit a useful multi-modal program.

Conclusions

This evaluation of a community-based Memory Wellness Program demonstrated increased cognitive function in older adults presenting with concerns about their cognition and memory. The statistically significant results and medium to large effect sizes suggest that further research is warranted to assess the efficacy of multi-modal community-based programs for improving memory and mental health with a focus on dementia risk reduction in older adults.

Keywords
Health behaviour, Independent living, Loneliness, Nursing, Preventative Health

Background and Objectives

Methods

Results

Tables

STATUS: In Review

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 5
HTML Views: 86

Integrity Check:

Peer Review Timeline

Version 1

Posted 03 Jul, 2019

  • No community comments so far
  • Review #1 received

    Received 15 Aug, 2019

  • Reviewer #2 agreed

    On 09 Jul, 2019

  • 11 reviewer(s) invited

    Invitations sent on 05 Jul, 2019

  • Reviewer #1 agreed

    On 05 Jul, 2019

  • Submission checks complete

    On 01 Jul, 2019

  • Editor assigned

    On 01 Jul, 2019

  • Editor invited

    On 30 Jun, 2019

  • First submitted

    On 18 Jun, 2019

Comments (0)

Comments can take the form of short reviews, notes or questions to the author. Comments will be posted immediately, but removed and moderated if flagged.

Learn more about our company.

Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

A RE-AIM Evaluation of a multi-modal real-world intervention for dementia risk reduction

Christine Stirling, Helga Merl, Indra Arunachalam, Ashley Turner, Carolyn King

STATUS: In Review

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 5
HTML Views: 86

Integrity Check:

  • Article

  • Peer Review Timeline

  • Related Articles

  • Comments

Abstract

Background

This implementation study evaluated a novel community-based Memory Wellness Program targeting dementia risk reduction through increasing health knowledge and health promoting behaviours in older adults. The nurse-led eight-week program involved the following behaviour change strategies: goal-setting, education, group activity, and introduction to the use of iPads and Misfit activity trackers. The multi-model program was delivered in a realworld setting using pop-up clinics run by a Registered Nurse, across 18 different sites.

Methods

Using a quasi-experimental mixed methods design, and a RE-AIM framework, the study evaluated the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation and maintenance of the MWP. A total of 179 older adults aged 65 years and over participated in the evaluation across eighteen locations in three states and a territory of Australia. Paired t-tests were carried out on all pretest-posttest clinical data. In-depth interviews were conducted with seventeen participants and staff.

Results

Engagement in the program was associated with improved cognition, lowered BP and stress and increased engagement with technology. There was a trend towards reduced feelings of loneliness. Participants’ main motivations for undertaking the program were to improve memory, meet new people and improve technology use and computer literacy, with most participants reporting that these goals had been met through the program. The program was effective across multiple sites demonstrating it can successfully be implemented in different contexts and that the range of behaviour change techniques suit a useful multi-modal program.

Conclusions

This evaluation of a community-based Memory Wellness Program demonstrated increased cognitive function in older adults presenting with concerns about their cognition and memory. The statistically significant results and medium to large effect sizes suggest that further research is warranted to assess the efficacy of multi-modal community-based programs for improving memory and mental health with a focus on dementia risk reduction in older adults.

Background and Objectives

Methods

Results

Tables

Learn more about our company.