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Research article

Effect of yoga on sleep quality in women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Weili Wang, Kuang-Huei Chen, Ying-Chieh Pan, Szu-Nian Yang, Yuan-Yu Chan

Abstract

Objectives

To examine the effectiveness and safety of yoga for women with sleep problems by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods

Medline/PubMed, Clincalkey, ScienceDirect, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched throughout the month of June 2019. Randomized controlled trials comparing yoga groups with control groups in women with sleep problems were included. Two reviewers independently evaluated risk of bias by using the risk of bias tool suggested by the Cochrane Collaboration for programming and conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The main outcome measure was sleep quality, which was measured using subjective instruments, such as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), or objective instruments, such as polysomnography, actigraphy, and safety of the intervention. For each outcome, standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined.

Results

Nineteen studies including 1832 participants were included in this systematic review. Meta-analyses revealed positive effects of yoga using PSQI or ISI scores in 16 randomized control trials (RCTs) compared with the control group in improving sleep quality in women, PSQI (SMD = −0.42; 95% CI = −0.76 to −0.09 ; P = 0.01). However, three RCTs revealed no effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving sleep quality in women using ISI (SMD = −0.13; 95% CI = −0.74 to 0.48; P = 0.69). Seven RCTs revealed no evidence for effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving sleep quality for women with breast cancer using PSQI (SMD = −0.15 ; 95% CI = −0.31 to 0.01; P = 0.5). Four RCTs revealed no evidence for the effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving the sleep quality for peri-or postmenopausal women using PSQI (SMD = −0.31; 95% CI = −0.95 to 0.33; P = 0.34).Yoga was not associated with serious adverse events.

Discussion

This systematic review and meta-analysis found that yoga intervention in various groups of women was beneficial in managing sleep problems. Despite certain disadvantages in methodology in the included studies, yoga may be recommended as an additional therapy to women in addition to pharmacological treatment.

Keywords
yoga, sleep quality, insomnia, women, complementary and alternative medicine, meta-analysis, review

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Conclusions

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Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

Effect of yoga on sleep quality in women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Weili Wang, Kuang-Huei Chen, Ying-Chieh Pan, Szu-Nian Yang, Yuan-Yu Chan

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Abstract

Objectives

To examine the effectiveness and safety of yoga for women with sleep problems by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods

Medline/PubMed, Clincalkey, ScienceDirect, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched throughout the month of June 2019. Randomized controlled trials comparing yoga groups with control groups in women with sleep problems were included. Two reviewers independently evaluated risk of bias by using the risk of bias tool suggested by the Cochrane Collaboration for programming and conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The main outcome measure was sleep quality, which was measured using subjective instruments, such as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), or objective instruments, such as polysomnography, actigraphy, and safety of the intervention. For each outcome, standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined.

Results

Nineteen studies including 1832 participants were included in this systematic review. Meta-analyses revealed positive effects of yoga using PSQI or ISI scores in 16 randomized control trials (RCTs) compared with the control group in improving sleep quality in women, PSQI (SMD = −0.42; 95% CI = −0.76 to −0.09 ; P = 0.01). However, three RCTs revealed no effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving sleep quality in women using ISI (SMD = −0.13; 95% CI = −0.74 to 0.48; P = 0.69). Seven RCTs revealed no evidence for effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving sleep quality for women with breast cancer using PSQI (SMD = −0.15 ; 95% CI = −0.31 to 0.01; P = 0.5). Four RCTs revealed no evidence for the effects of yoga compared with the control group in improving the sleep quality for peri-or postmenopausal women using PSQI (SMD = −0.31; 95% CI = −0.95 to 0.33; P = 0.34).Yoga was not associated with serious adverse events.

Discussion

This systematic review and meta-analysis found that yoga intervention in various groups of women was beneficial in managing sleep problems. Despite certain disadvantages in methodology in the included studies, yoga may be recommended as an additional therapy to women in addition to pharmacological treatment.

Figures

Background

Methods

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

Abbreviations

Declarations

References

Tables

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