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The effect of oxygenation by continuous low-pressure oxygen flow through thyrocricocentesis cannulation on asphyxia-induced injury in canines: a randomized prospective animal study.

Fengyi Huang, Feng Chen, Xiaochun Zheng, Fei Gao

Abstract

Background To observe the oxygenation efficacy using a continuous low-pressure oxygen flow through thyrocricoid emergency airway by venous catheter needle in asphyxic canine models. Methods Eighteen healthy male canines were randomly assigned to three groups: group A (control), group B (continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation), and group C (continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation with chest compression). After thyrocricocentesis cannulation and intubation, ventilation was stopped for 40 minutes to establish an asphyxic model. Electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, and arterial blood gas analysis were performed in that duration. Concentrations of S100β protein, cardiac troponin I, and creatine kinase isoenzyme and moisture ratio of brain tissue were measured before asphyxia and 2 hours and 4 hours after resuscitation. Measurement data was described as mean ± SD; one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) or paired t-test was used to determine differences over time within groups. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The pace of decline in oxygen saturation, partial pressure of oxygen, and pH and rise in partial pressure of carbon dioxide and lactate were slower in the other two groups than in the control group. Similarly, a delay in the increase in concentration of S100β protein and cardiac troponin I was observed. Moreover, cerebral edema in groups B and C was significantly alleviated. The level of serum S100β, cTnI, and moisture ratio of brain tissue was lower in group C than in group B (p < 0.05). Conclusions The implications of continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation through venous catheter needle after thyrocricoid puncture with assisted chest compression can ameliorate oxygenation in vivo, slow the increase of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reduce the accumulation of H+ ions. Consequently, it could attenuate the injury to vital organs, and hence improve prognosis. The study showed that it can be a promising approach for managing patients with asphyxia in routine clinical settings.

Keywords
continuous low-pressure oxygen; venous catheter needle; thyrocricocentesis; continuous oxygenation; partial pressure of oxygen; brain; heart; prognosis

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Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.

The effect of oxygenation by continuous low-pressure oxygen flow through thyrocricocentesis cannulation on asphyxia-induced injury in canines: a randomized prospective animal study.

Fengyi Huang, Feng Chen, Xiaochun Zheng, Fei Gao

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Abstract

Background To observe the oxygenation efficacy using a continuous low-pressure oxygen flow through thyrocricoid emergency airway by venous catheter needle in asphyxic canine models. Methods Eighteen healthy male canines were randomly assigned to three groups: group A (control), group B (continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation), and group C (continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation with chest compression). After thyrocricocentesis cannulation and intubation, ventilation was stopped for 40 minutes to establish an asphyxic model. Electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, and arterial blood gas analysis were performed in that duration. Concentrations of S100β protein, cardiac troponin I, and creatine kinase isoenzyme and moisture ratio of brain tissue were measured before asphyxia and 2 hours and 4 hours after resuscitation. Measurement data was described as mean ± SD; one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) or paired t-test was used to determine differences over time within groups. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The pace of decline in oxygen saturation, partial pressure of oxygen, and pH and rise in partial pressure of carbon dioxide and lactate were slower in the other two groups than in the control group. Similarly, a delay in the increase in concentration of S100β protein and cardiac troponin I was observed. Moreover, cerebral edema in groups B and C was significantly alleviated. The level of serum S100β, cTnI, and moisture ratio of brain tissue was lower in group C than in group B (p < 0.05). Conclusions The implications of continuous low-pressure oxygen flow insufflation through venous catheter needle after thyrocricoid puncture with assisted chest compression can ameliorate oxygenation in vivo, slow the increase of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reduce the accumulation of H+ ions. Consequently, it could attenuate the injury to vital organs, and hence improve prognosis. The study showed that it can be a promising approach for managing patients with asphyxia in routine clinical settings.

Figures

Introduction

Materials and Methods

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

List of abbreviations

Declarations

References

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