Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

Finite element method analysis of occlusal splint therapy in patients with bruxism

Seifollah Gholampour, Hanie Gholampour New, Hamed Khanmohammadi New

Abstract

Background: In general, habits such as bruxism are contributory factors for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and its etiology is still controversial. Methods: Three-dimensional models of maxilla and mandible and teeth of 37 patients and 36 control subject were made using in-vivo image data. The maximum values of stress and deformation were calculated in 21 patients six months after using a splint and compared with the initial conditions. Results: The maximum stresses in the jaw bone and head of mandible in patients were 4.4 and 4.1 times higher than those in control subjects, respectively. Similar values for deformation were 5.8 and 4.9, respectively. Six months after splint application, the maximum stress in the jaw bone and head of mandible decreased by up to 71.0% and 72.8%, respectively. Similar values for the maximum deformation were 80.7% and 78.7%, respectively. With occlusal splint therapy, the approximation of the maximum deformation to the relevant values in control subjects was about 2.6 times the approximation of maximum stress to the relevant values in control subjects. The maximum stress and maximum deformation occurred in all cases in the head of the mandible and the splint had the highest effectiveness in jaw bone adjacent to the molar teeth. Conclusions: Splint acts as a stress relaxer and dissipates the extra generated stresses and especially the deformation and deviations of TMJ due to bruxism. The splint also makes the bilateral and simultaneous loading possible and helps with the treatment of this disorder through regulation of bruxism by creating a biomechanical equilibrium between the physiological loading and the generated stress.

Keywords
Occlusal splint therapy, bruxism, stress, deformation, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), finite element method (FEM).

Figures

Background

Methods

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

Abbreviations

Declarations

References

Table 3

STATUS: In Revision

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 0
HTML Views: 18

Integrity Check:

Peer Review Timeline

Version 2

Posted 06 Aug, 2019

  • No community comments so far
  • Review #2 received

    Received 05 Aug, 2019

  • Editorial decision: Minor revision

    On 05 Aug, 2019

  • Reviewer #2 agreed

    On 26 Jul, 2019

  • Reviewer #1 agreed

    On 25 Jul, 2019

  • Review #1 received

    Received 25 Jul, 2019

  • Editor assigned

    On 23 Jul, 2019

  • 2 reviewer(s) invited

    Invitations sent on 23 Jul, 2019

  • Submission checks complete

    On 22 Jul, 2019

  • Editor invited

    On 22 Jul, 2019

Version 1

Posted 06 Jun, 2019

View this version

Subject Areas

Dentistry

More from BMC Oral Health

Comments (0)

Comments can take the form of short reviews, notes or questions to the author. Comments will be posted immediately, but removed and moderated if flagged.

Learn more about our company.

Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

Finite element method analysis of occlusal splint therapy in patients with bruxism

Seifollah Gholampour, Hanie Gholampour New, Hamed Khanmohammadi New

STATUS: In Revision

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 0
HTML Views: 18

Integrity Check:

  • Article

  • Peer Review Timeline

  • Related Articles

  • Comments

Abstract

Background: In general, habits such as bruxism are contributory factors for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and its etiology is still controversial. Methods: Three-dimensional models of maxilla and mandible and teeth of 37 patients and 36 control subject were made using in-vivo image data. The maximum values of stress and deformation were calculated in 21 patients six months after using a splint and compared with the initial conditions. Results: The maximum stresses in the jaw bone and head of mandible in patients were 4.4 and 4.1 times higher than those in control subjects, respectively. Similar values for deformation were 5.8 and 4.9, respectively. Six months after splint application, the maximum stress in the jaw bone and head of mandible decreased by up to 71.0% and 72.8%, respectively. Similar values for the maximum deformation were 80.7% and 78.7%, respectively. With occlusal splint therapy, the approximation of the maximum deformation to the relevant values in control subjects was about 2.6 times the approximation of maximum stress to the relevant values in control subjects. The maximum stress and maximum deformation occurred in all cases in the head of the mandible and the splint had the highest effectiveness in jaw bone adjacent to the molar teeth. Conclusions: Splint acts as a stress relaxer and dissipates the extra generated stresses and especially the deformation and deviations of TMJ due to bruxism. The splint also makes the bilateral and simultaneous loading possible and helps with the treatment of this disorder through regulation of bruxism by creating a biomechanical equilibrium between the physiological loading and the generated stress.

Figures

Background

Methods

Results

Discussion

Conclusions

Abbreviations

Declarations

References

Table 3

Learn more about our company.