Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

The effect of the waiting room's environment on level of anxiety experienced by children prior to dental treatment: a case control study

Avia Fux-Noy, Maayan Zohar, Karin Herzog, Aviv Shmueli, Elinor Halperson, Moti Moskovitz, Diana Ram
DOI: 10.21203/rs.2.11573/v1

Abstract

Background: One of the environmental factors that can cause anxiety prior to dental treatment includes the waiting room experience, specifically the amount of time spent awaiting treatment and the waiting room environment. The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of the waiting room's environment on the level of anxiety experienced by children in multisensory and traditional waiting rooms. Methods: Case control study. Test group waited for treatment in a multisensory waiting room, which consisted of a lighting column that children could touch and climb; as well as, rhythmic music played on loudspeakers. Control group waited for treatment in a traditional waiting room. Study participants were asked to answer the “Venham Picture Test”, a dental anxiety scale, while in the waiting room prior to entering the treatment room. Chi-squared, Fisher's Exact tests, and linear regression were utilized. Results: No significant difference in dental anxiety scores was found between the test and control groups. Dental anxiety was significantly higher in patients who had longer wait time prior to treatment. In addition, dental anxiety was significantly associated with visit purpose: children waiting for dental examination or those scheduled for dental treatment with conscious sedation were less anxious than children waiting for emergency treatment. Conclusions: These findings underscore the importance of a dental home and regular preventive dental visits. Children’s dental anxiety can be reduced by preventing emergency treatments, scheduling routine dental visits and decreasing waiting room wait time. Trial registration: TRN NCT03197129, date of registration June 20, 2017

Background

Methods

Results

Discussion

List of abbreviations

Declarations

References

Tables

STATUS: In Review

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Version 1

Posted 18 Jul, 2019

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  • Reviewer #3 agreed

    On 19 Aug, 2019

  • Review #1 received

    Received 02 Aug, 2019

  • Review #2 received

    Received 02 Aug, 2019

  • Reviewer #2 agreed

    On 19 Jul, 2019

  • Submission checks complete

    On 16 Jul, 2019

  • Editor assigned

    On 16 Jul, 2019

  • 4 reviewer(s) invited

    Invitations sent on 16 Jul, 2019

  • Reviewer #1 agreed

    On 16 Jul, 2019

  • Editor invited

    On 15 Jul, 2019

  • First submitted

    On 02 Jul, 2019

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Preprint: Please note that this article has not completed peer review.
Research article

The effect of the waiting room's environment on level of anxiety experienced by children prior to dental treatment: a case control study

Avia Fux-Noy, Maayan Zohar, Karin Herzog, Aviv Shmueli, Elinor Halperson, Moti Moskovitz, Diana Ram

STATUS: In Review

Comments: 0
PDF Downloads: 0
HTML Views: 6

Integrity Check:

  • Article

  • Peer Review Timeline

  • Related Articles

  • Comments

Abstract

Background: One of the environmental factors that can cause anxiety prior to dental treatment includes the waiting room experience, specifically the amount of time spent awaiting treatment and the waiting room environment. The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of the waiting room's environment on the level of anxiety experienced by children in multisensory and traditional waiting rooms. Methods: Case control study. Test group waited for treatment in a multisensory waiting room, which consisted of a lighting column that children could touch and climb; as well as, rhythmic music played on loudspeakers. Control group waited for treatment in a traditional waiting room. Study participants were asked to answer the “Venham Picture Test”, a dental anxiety scale, while in the waiting room prior to entering the treatment room. Chi-squared, Fisher's Exact tests, and linear regression were utilized. Results: No significant difference in dental anxiety scores was found between the test and control groups. Dental anxiety was significantly higher in patients who had longer wait time prior to treatment. In addition, dental anxiety was significantly associated with visit purpose: children waiting for dental examination or those scheduled for dental treatment with conscious sedation were less anxious than children waiting for emergency treatment. Conclusions: These findings underscore the importance of a dental home and regular preventive dental visits. Children’s dental anxiety can be reduced by preventing emergency treatments, scheduling routine dental visits and decreasing waiting room wait time. Trial registration: TRN NCT03197129, date of registration June 20, 2017

Background

Methods

Results

Discussion

List of abbreviations

Declarations

References

Tables

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